make do

Late last year I discovered a small tear toward the bottom of a not inexpensive sheet. The sheet was only a year or two old and is one of 3 sets in regular use, so this was somewhat annoying. I was planning to consign it to the old-sheet-stash and buy a replacement set, but then reconsidered and thought I’d give patching ago.

This is part of a wider plan to try to avoid buying a lot of new things if we can make do – partly motivated by frugality, partly from wanting to reduce consumption of stuff and avoid waste.

Because the tear was near the bottom edge it can absorb a fair amount of less than fabulous craftsmanship. And the craftsmanship was definitely less than fabulous! If I had to do this again, I’d likely take a different approach because the result is a little lumpy and chunky. But I was so thorough that I suspect the patch will outlast the sheet.


not entirely the best photograph of not entirely the best patch

Yes, bodgy as all get out. But, hey, maybe it will last another year (or two) and the cash I would have spent can go into the holiday fund (or the artwork fund, or the pay-off-the-mortgage-early fund, or the carobaby pretty dress fund).

There’s also another sheet I’ve consigned to the old-sheet-stash which I might drag out and see what I can do to get it back in the rotation – more less waste!

I daresay I’ll quickly spoil all this virtuousness by rushing out and buying something completely frivolous and unnecessary. I can never quite decide if I am the crunchy hippy type or the extravagant spender – I suspect both.

About carolbaby

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2 Responses to make do

  1. hirstsj says:

    This resonated with me, but you are leading the way. You can also claim to be a fan of Japanese boro stitching, a follower of the wabi-sabi principle and therefore a very cool person. Like me!

    Like

    • carolbaby says:

      Haha, thank you!

      I adore boro! We saw some wonderful examples at the Amuse Museum when we were in Tokyo. It was pretty amazing to be actually encouraged to touch items that were many generations old.

      Like

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